• itslaurenofcourse

Blueberry Muffins with Maple Glaze and Bacon Streusel

Updated: Aug 25

This might be the best grab-and-go stack of blueberry pancakes with a side of bacon there is!  


Blueberry muffins just got a makeover and, oh, do they look and taste better than ever. The batter is made with 1 cup of creme fraiche, which makes for a dense and tender crumb. But the showstopper is the bacon streusel. Oh my, is that GOOD! Just a hint of bacon in every bite is a game changer. So is the the scalability: this recipe doubles easily to make 24 muffins instead of 12.


Equipment: muffin tins; paper muffin liners; dry and wet measuring cups; measuring spoons; large & medium mixing bowls; hand or standing mixer; whisk; rubber spatula; cooling rack; spoon

Muffin Ingredients: 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup sugar

½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon salt

2 cups frozen blueberries

2 eggs, lightly beaten

1 cup creme fraiche (or sour cream) ½ cup vegetable oil 2 teaspoons vanilla extract Bacon Streusel Ingredients: 2 slices crispy, cooked bacon, crumbled ¼ cup light brown sugar

¼ cup all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened



Maple Glaze Ingredients: 1 cup confectioner's sugar

1 tablespoon maple syrup


1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Line a muffin tin with paper muffin liners and set aside.


2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and soda, and salt.


3. Add the frozen berries and toss well to coat in the flour-sugar mixture. Set aside.


ILOC tip: When it's peak blueberry season, stock up and start freezing. Frozen berries are ideal for muffins because they are juicier thanks to the process of becoming frozen. When they are added to the muffin batter, they bleed just a little, releasing their flavor even more than their stain.

4. In another bowl, whisk the eggs, creme fraiche, oil, and vanilla. Pour over the berry mixture and stir well to incorporate.

5. Fill the paper-lined muffin tin three-quarters with batter.


6. Bake for 20-25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of a muffin comes out clean. Remove the pan to a rack to cool.


7. While the muffins bake, prepare the streusel and glaze. In a small bowl, mix the brown sugar, flour, and butter with your fingers, pressing the butter so it combines with the other ingredients. Work in the crumbled bacon. Spread the mixture onto a parchment-lined sheet pan and bake in the 400°F oven for 8-10 minutes. Remove from the oven. Once cool, break apart the streusel topping into small chunks and crumbs, using a fork or your hands. Set aside.


8. To make the glaze, combine the confectioner's sugar with the maple syrup using a small whisk or spoon. Set aside.


9. Once the muffins are cool, drizzle each muffin with maple glaze and sprinkle with bacon streusel.


Makes 12 muffins.


Store muffins in an airtight container at room temperature for up to one week, or freeze immediately for up to 3 months.



Rise to the Occasion - Baking Soda v. Baking Powder

Baking soda and baking powder are both leavening agents – ingredients that produce a gas, which causes batters and doughs to rise.


Baking soda is simply sodium bicarbonate, which does not have any leavening capabilities by itself. It is only when baking soda is mixed with an acid such as sour cream, molasses, lemon juice, or buttermilk that these gases are released. Because these gases start forming right after the baking soda and acid are mixed, batters using baking soda should be baked immediately after mixing.

Baking powder actually consists of baking soda and an acid, usually cream of tartar, calcium acid phosphate, sodium aluminum sulfate, or a mixture of the three. Double-acting baking powder, the most common type, is usually made of baking soda, sodium aluminum sulfate, calcium acid phosphate, and cornstarch (used as a drying agent). It is called double-acting baking powder because it has two rising actions. The first time the mixture rises is when a liquid comes in contact with the baking powder, and the second time is when the batter is exposed to heat. This makes it possible to mix the ingredients ahead of time and to bake the dough whenever it is convenient.

Soft butter is a must! No cold butter straight from the fridge . . . because It's Lauren, of Course!

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